FAQ'S


Condensation Causes & Cures ... ?

                 - What is Condensation?
                 - What to do if Condensation Appears on Your New Harvey Windows
                 - Controlling Indoor Humidity
                 - Condensation in the Home - A Warning Sign
                 - Temporary Condensation

Windows serve as visible areas for moisture to condense to warn you that there is too much moisture in the air inside your house


What is Condensation?

Condensation comes from the moisture in the air, and is caused by too much moisture in the air for a certain temperature. Condensation forms when warm, moist air touches a surface that is colder than the dew point of the warm air. As that air becomes colder and its temperature drops below its dew point, it must release excess moisture to reach its new, lower dew point. It releases moisture in the form of water, which appears on the colder surface.

Example: A common example of moisture condensation is when a glass of ice water "sweats" when you  bring  it outside in the summer. When the warm, moist air touches the cold glass, the temperature of the air drops below its dew point, forcing the air to release moisture in the form of water on the sides of the glass. There are many things in our homes that put moisture into the air. Normal breathing and perspiration adds 3 pints of water to the air every day for each person in your home. In fact, every activity that uses water adds more moisture to the air including cooking, taking showers, dish washing, and doing laundry.


What to do if Condensation Appears on Your New Harvey Windows?

Your new Harvey Windows are designed to prevent air infiltration into and out of your home. Your old, drafty windows allowed the moisture in your home to escape (along with your heat)! Your new Harvey Windows are tight and do not allow the moisture in your home to escape. You need to control the humidity in your home.

Controlling Indoor Humidity

Homes are now made tighter than ever. They are well insulated and no longer "breath" on their own. Steps must be taken to ventilate the house, allowing moisture and humidity to escape.
 

Steps you can take to control the humidity in your home include:
* Venting gas burners and clothes dryers to the outside.
* Installing exhaust fans in the kitchen, bathrooms, and laundry rooms.
* Controlling or covering other sources of humidity (radiator water pans, fish tanks, large numbers of  plants, etc.).

* Installing a dehumidifier.
* Opening fireplace damper.
* Ventilating the crawl space or basement: Install foundation vents or leave a basement window cracked in the fall or early winter to ventilate your basement or crawl space.
* Ventilating the attic: Because of vapor pressure, the moist warm air from your home can go right through your ceiling into your attic. If your attic is not ventilated, the humid air will condense on the cold   underside of your roof. This condensation can start to rot the roof boards, cause ice dams, or drip    down onto the ceiling below and damage your plaster, paint, and attic insulation. With proper    ventilation, you can eliminate condensation before it causes any major damage to your    home. Remember, windows do not cause condensation. The best way to avoid condensation is to reduce the humidity of the air inside your home.


Condensation in the Home - A Warning Sign

Condensation can occur wherever warm, moist air comes in contact with a colder surface, which is why it usually happens during the winter. During winter, the air in your house is much warmer than the air outside.
Condensation usually is first noticed on your windows because they are the most visible areas of your house. Condensation on your windows means that the air in your house has too much moisture in it. Your indoor humidity is too high. While you notice condensation first on your windows, it could mean that your excessive indoor humidity is causing damage elsewhere in places you can't see, such as: your walls, ceilings, floors, and your attic roof. Excessive indoor humidity can cause blistering and peeling paint, warping and rotting wood, as well as the formation of mildew.


Temporary Condensation

Wood, plaster, cement, and other building materials used in new construction and remodeling produce a great deal of moisture. A new home or addition will have excessive moisture from the new foundation. Concrete does not dry completely for up to one year. Rapid drops in temperature can also create temporary condensation problems during the heating season.

 

 

 

 

Where can I find ... U- and R-Values for Harvey Products?

R-Value is a measure of resistance to heat gain or loss. The higher the number, the better a product is at resisting heat loss.

U-Value, the reciprocal of R-Value, is the measure of the rate of heat loss through a material. Thus, in all aspects of home design, one should strive for the lowest U-Values possible because the lower the U-Value, the less heat that is needlessly escaping.

Windows with "clear" glass are the least efficient, while windows with Low-E are much more thermally effective. The best performing windows are those using Low-E/Argon glazing. With this glazing, all Harvey vinyl windows are ENERGY STAR® qualified throughout the country.

Download U-Value & R-Value Charts

 

A detailed listing of U- and R-Values for Harvey Manufactured Products is available in PDF format, and requires the FREE Adobe Acrobat Reader

Please note that U-Values are subject to change without notice.

Download the U-and R-U_R_Values Test Results Chart now.

State Energy Code Information

Some states such as Massachusetts have enacted more stringent Energy Code guidelines that require the use of special glazing such as Low-E glass in replacement windows. Please refer to the state building codes for specific guidelines.

Massachusetts Energy Code
The Massachusetts Energy Code states that all replacement windows shall have a maximum U-Value of .44 as of January 1, 1999. All windows must be NFRC (National Fenestration Rating Council) certified and labeled as such.

January 5, 1999 Amendments

Exception 1: Criteria for NFRC listing/labeling and maximum U-0.44 are not required if the existing window(s) are true divided light (i.e. single thickness multi-pane sashes with structural muntin bars) and being replaced with "like kind" units. This exception additionally requires that a storm window be installed over the replacement window.

Exception 2: Criteria for NFRC listing/labeling and maximum U-0.44 are not required for basement windows with a unit height up to 24", whether or not the basement is a conditioned space.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What if... ?

For Double Hung Windows:


Disengaged Pivot Bar
 


Engaged Pivot Bar

Make sure that the pivot bar (cast metal at the bottom of sash) is seated in the metal housing (can) on the side of the track. If it is not, it must be reinserted.
NOTE: Housings in track must be parallel to each other to disengage the brake. For a larger view of the photos to the right, you may click on them.

Check to see if any of the two pieces of metal (pivot bar) described above have broken, leaving fragments in the bottom of the track. If your pivot bar is broken, you may order a replacement part by clicking here.

Check to see if any part of the vinyl on the sash or in the track has been cracked or sustained damage.

If you have checked your double hung window for all of the above circumstances and it still does not close or operate correctly, please e-mail us and describe the problem to us.

 

For Casement Windows:

We recommend, that you clean and lubricate the hinges at least twice a year. If you haven't lubricated the mechanical portion (crank mechanism & hinges), please do so with a light oil.

Check the operating arms to see if they have become bent or unfastened from the unit or sash itself.

Check to see if the window sash lock keeper comes in contact with the lock itself.

If you have checked your casement window for all of the above circumstances and it still does not close or operate correctly, please e-mail us and describe the problem to us.

 

 

How do I replace the Pivot Bar in my Harvey window?

·         For Vinyl or Majesty Wood Mechanical Sash

·         For Vinyl Welded Sash

 

For Vinyl or Majesty Wood Mechanical Sash

Step 1:  Unlock the window and lift the bottom sash 6 - 8".

 

Step 2:  Use the Tilt-Latch to tilt the bottom sash into your home.

 

Step 3:  If there is a pivot retainer (plastic clip) in your model, it must be removed with the end of a pen or like device.

 

Step 4:  Disengage the bottom sash from the frame by lifting one side and then the other.
 
If you need to replace the pivot bar in your top sash, you must first pull your top sash down 6 - 8". Then, follow the same procedure in steps 2 through 4.

 

Step 5:  Remove the cap from the bottom of the sash.

 

Step 6:  Unscrew the pivot bar.

 

Step 7:  Remove the pivot bar from the sash and replace it with the new pivot bar by following the reverse procedure above.

 

 

 

For Vinyl Welded Sash

Step 1:  Unlock the window and lift the bottom sash 6 - 8".

 

Step 2:  Use the Tilt-Latch to tilt the bottom sash into your home.

 

Step 3:  If there is a pivot retainer in your model, it must be removed with the end of a pen or like device.

 

Step 4:  Disengage the bottom sash from the frame by lifting one side and then the other.
 
If you need to replace the pivot bar in your top sash, you must first pull your top sash down 6 - 8". Then, follow the same procedure in steps 2 through 4.

 

Step 5:  Use 3/16" drill bit to remove rivets.

 

Step 6:  Remove the pivot bar from the sash.

 

Step 7:  Use 6 x 5/8" flat head screws or rivets to install new pivot bar.

 

 

 

 

 

How do I remove my window screens?

Double Hung Window - Full Screen

 

Our full screens are designed as "side mount" systems. To remove them, follow the steps below:

Step 1:  Remove both sash.

 

Step 1a:  Unlock the window and lift the bottom sash 6 - 8".

 

Step 1b:  Use the Tilt-Latch to tilt the bottom sash into your home.

 

Step 1c:  If there is a pivot retainer (plastic clip) in your model, it must be removed with the end of a pen or like device.

 

Step 1d:  Disengage the bottom sash from the frame by lifting one side and then the other.
 
To remove the top sash, pull the top sash down 6 - 8" and follow the same procedure in steps 1b through 1d.

 

Step 2:  Once both sash are removed, you may take hold of the pull tabs located on the right side of your screen. Pull the screen to the left and push out.
 
If it is easier for you to release one end of the screen first, pull the top half of your screen to the left and push out. Then, do the same for the bottom.

 

Step 3:  Replace both sash by following the reverse of the instructions above.

 

 

 

Double Hung Window - Half Screen

Step 1:  Raise your lower sash approximately 4 to 6 inches above the sill.


 
 

Step 2:  Raise your screen up to approximately 4 inches from the top.

Step 3:  With your lower sash raised, retract the window sash release latches on the top of the sash and gently tilt the window sash toward you until it rests on the sill.

Step 4:  Lower the top window sash to approximately 8 to 10 inches above the sill. Retract the latches until it rests on the lower sash.

Step 5:  Take hold of the top and bottom rails on the right side of your half screen.

Step 6:  If your screen has release latches on the bottom rail, you may push the release latch and the top rail towards the left and push out. This will disengage the lock on your screen to remove it.
 
If your screen does not have release latches on the bottom rail, you may just push the top and bottom rails to the left and push out.

 

 

 

 

 

How can I install an air conditioner in my Harvey Vinyl Windows?

 

You cannot rest the air conditioner directly on the vinyl sill. We suggest you put a 2 x 4 into the sill track that measures 1" or 2" higher than the sill so the air conditioner can rest on it.

 

Pivot Bar Replacement Instructions

 

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